College Ready

Sharing strategies for student success, college readiness and academic coaching


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5 Steps to a Growth Mindset in the Classroom

“Never question ability, always improve strategy.”

Here’s a visual guide to fostering a growth mindset in the classroom. I linked a video to Angela Duckworth’s excellent TedTalk on the subject at the bottom of this post.

Growth Mindset in the Classroom (C) M J Bromley 2014

Click here for Angela Duckworth’s tedTalk on why we need to encourage growth mindset with our students.

I hope you found this infographic helpful. If you need more information on how to foster grit and a a growth mindset in your classroom, feel free to reach out in the comments.

Best,

Lisa, aka The Happy Teacher


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Yes, It Pays to Go to College. Here’s Why.

Does it pay to go to college? Yes!

We hear that question a lot in the news. And the simple answer is, yes…it does. These statistics from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reflect the difference in weekly salary and in the unemployment rate between a worker with a high school diploma and a college degree. 

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So, the answer is yes, but proceed with awareness. See my earlier post regarding the ROI–Return on Investment-of a college degree. The territory needs to be navigated with not only enthusiasm for a certain school or university, but with awareness and information. This awareness should include a strategy to get to the finish line with a diploma in hand and without the burden of too much debt. To do this, make sure to carefully consider which college you attend, for how long, and what if any student loan debt you will have upon graduation. Visit your on-campus advisors and counselors early and often and make sure to have the information you need to be informed.

Millennials are the workplace of the future. Those with degrees will not only be more employable after graduation, they will make higher salaries and be in demand.


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Beyond the 3Rs: Skills all Students Will Need to Thrive in the Global Market

Move over Reading, Writing, and ‘Rithmatic.”  According to “The Learning Curve,” here are the 8 “Must-Have” skills students will need in the future to stay competitive:

Leadership. Digital Literacy. Communication. Emotional Intelligence. Entrepreneurship. Global Citizenship. Problem Solving. Team Working.

Notice the strong reliance on the social-emotional aspects of interpersonal communication, along with the need to lead and be able to work in a collaborative environment. Students often balk at group work, but this is what all future employers see as essential.

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These “21st century non-cognitive skills” are essential in a global market, and are defined as the “abilities important for social interaction.”

I found this post via Edudemic. You can read their entire post here. The information and graphic came from the original report called “The Learning Curve,” produced by Pearson. You can read it here.


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8 Types of Learners: Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom

What’s Your Learning Style?

AKA, what kind of smart are you?

Here’s an innovative and highly visual look at the types of learners we work with in our classrooms. Recognizing these multiple intelligences as valid and effective allows for diverse contributions to the academic conversation. Ask your students at the start of the school year to self-identify where they are on this wheel.  Let them “see” that there are “all kinds of smart.”

multiple intelligence wheel

You can also encourage students to take any number of free online surveys that will help them to determine which type of learner they are. Here is one I often use with my students, from the folks at LiteracyNet. There are 56 questions,(don’t worry, it goes fast, just a bubble to select), and after answering all of them, the student will get their top three strengths, as well as how the other 5 intelligences rank. This information is extremely helpful to students, as they can devise study strategies around their individual learning styles.

Fun facts: Did you know that 65 % of all students are visual learners? (Mind Tools, 1988). However, as much as 80% of instruction is typically done orally. (University of Illinois, 2009)


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How to be a Scholar. 6 Steps to Encourage Critical Thinking

As we get to the end of the semester and school year, we are expecting our students to demonstrate higher order thinking skills, or Critical Thinking. I like this infographic from Learning Commons at the University of British Columbia.

Critical Thinking Toolkit

Thanks to its simple flow chart style, students can use it to clearly reflect on their own thinking. Students need to constantly question their own process, and those of others. They need to ask questions about the text they read, test possibilities, and allow for new discoveries.

Higher order thinking skills (HOTS) push our students beyond simple responses and elevate them to scholars and critics in their own right. Part of what’s vital in education is for students to learn to trust their own voice, while still questioning their thinking. What strategies do you use in your classroom to encourage critical thinking?

 


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Infographic: Using Digital Resources to Propel Student Success

Digital Resources in the Classroom, from PBS Learning Media

With 74% of teachers saying educational technology motivates students, and two-thirds of teachers surveyed saying they want MORE classroom technology, it is clear that teachers are both embracing and utilizing digital resources in innovative and meaningful ways to facilitate student success. Engaged students are successful students!

How are you using digital resources in the classroom? Have you started a blog? Using iPads or e-readers? What innovative ideas have you come up with to help your students? I’d love to hear from you!

Creativity and Connection in the Classroom

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85% of college-educated professionals say creative thinking is critical for problem solving in their career.

Here’s what else they had to say on why creativity is such an important factor in our classrooms, in our careers, and in our everyday lives, as well:

Creativity and Connection in the Classroom

The study interviewed 1000 college-educated professionals who were employed full-time, 25+ years of age. See source “Creativity and Education: Why it Matters,” by Adobe.